ARTICLES

Oil Characteristics of Peanut Fruit Separated by a Nondestructive Maturity Classification Method

Authors: Timothy H. Sanders , John A. Lansden , R. Larry Greene , J. Stanley Drexler , E. Jay Williams

  • Oil Characteristics of Peanut Fruit Separated by a Nondestructive Maturity Classification Method

    ARTICLES

    Oil Characteristics of Peanut Fruit Separated by a Nondestructive Maturity Classification Method

    Authors: , , , ,

Abstract

A nondestructive peanut pod maturity classification method, Pod Maturity Profile (PMP), based on visual examination of the color and structural characteristics of pod mesocarp after partial removal of pod exocarp, was used to separate freshly harvested peanut pods into maturity classes. The separations made nondestructively were compared with those made by a method involving the examination of internal pericarp and testa characteristics. The groups separated by the two methods were closely related. In oil from the PMP classes, color decreased, free fatty acid content decreased, iodine value remained approximately constant, and oven stability of the extracted oil increased with increasing maturity. Total oil contents and fatty acid profiles had consistent but more complex relationships with maturity. The data indicate that the PMP method allows consistent and reproducible classification of peanut fruit maturity.

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Keywords: Arachis hypogaea, peanut, maturity, Physiological Maturity Index, Pod Maturity Profile, Peanut oil, oil stability, peanut quality

How to Cite:

Sanders, T. & Lansden, J. & Greene, R. & Drexler, J. & Williams, E., (1982) “Oil Characteristics of Peanut Fruit Separated by a Nondestructive Maturity Classification Method”, Peanut Science 9(1), p.20-23. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-9-1-6

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Published on
01 Jan 1982
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

4Mention of a trademark or proprietary product does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by U.S. Department of Agriculture or the University of Georgia and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that may also be suitable.