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Peanut Web Blotch: I. Cultural Characteristics and Identity of Causal Fungus¹

Authors: R. A. Taber , R. E. Pettit , G. L. Philley

  • Peanut Web Blotch: I. Cultural Characteristics and Identity of Causal Fungus¹

    ARTICLES

    Peanut Web Blotch: I. Cultural Characteristics and Identity of Causal Fungus¹

    Authors: , ,

Abstract

A foliar disease of peanuts, previously unreported in the USA, was found in Texas in 1972. The pathogen was identified as a species of Ascochyta. Further cultural studies have revealed this fungus to be Phoma arachidicola Marasas, Pauer, and Boerema. Pycnidia form profusely at 20 C and 25 C. Pycnidiospores are borne on short pycnidiosphores and are predominantly one-celled in culture. Spores produced in pycnidia on infected leaflets become 1 septate. Large 1-septate spores, as well as an occasional 2-septate spore, may form in culture. Optimum temperature for mycelial growth in 20 C; little or no growth occurs at 5 C or above 30 C. The teleomorphic state develops in the field on fallen leaflets and can be induced to form in the laboratory on sterilized peanut leaflets between 15 and 20 C. Cultures derived from single ascospores form pseudothecia. Pycnidiospores, ascospores, and chlamydospores are all infective units. Because this fungus produces hyaline ascospores and pseudoparaphyses, it has been transferred to the genus Didymella as Didymella arachidicola (Choch.) comb. nov. Comparisons with 15 isolates causing web blotch of peanut in the USA, Argentina, and South Africa indicate that web blotch symptoms are produced by the same fungal species.

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Keywords: Ascochyta, Phoma arachidicola, Arachis hypogaea, Groundnuts

How to Cite:

Taber, R. & Pettit, R. & Philley, G., (1984) “Peanut Web Blotch: I. Cultural Characteristics and Identity of Causal Fungus¹”, Peanut Science 11(2), p.109-114. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-11-2-16

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Published on
01 Jul 1984
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

1Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Paper No. 19630. Supported in part by Texas Peanut Producers Board.