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Physiology of Oil Seeds. VI. A Means to Break Dormancy of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seeds in the Field1,2

Author: D. L. Ketring

  • Physiology of Oil Seeds. VI. A Means to Break Dormancy of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seeds in the Field1,2

    ARTICLES

    Physiology of Oil Seeds. VI. A Means to Break Dormancy of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seeds in the Field1,2

    Author:

Abstract

Peanut seedling emergence is not uniform in some years. Lack of uniformity is most prevalent among the large-seeded peanut types (Virginia and Runner). Variations in the degree of dormancy of the large-seeded peanuts are a contributing factor. A procedure is described that will aid in increasing uniformity of large-seeded peanut seedling emergence by overcoming the dormancy factor.

A dust formulation of Ethrel (15%/W) was diluted with fungicide (Orthocide/Botran, 60-20 S.P. dust PN 5213) and applied to dry, Virginia-type ‘NC-13’ peanut seeds by shaking in a plastic bag. Concentrations of 0.5, 1, 3 and 5% Ethrel were tested for their effects on rate and total emergence of dormant seeds from vermiculite/sand potting mixtures and from 3 different soils. Also, seeds were stored after treatment and then planted at monthly intervals in soil to test the stability of the Ethrel-fungicide mixture, as indicated by the emergence of the initially dormant seeds.

All concentrations of Ethrel released the seeds from dormancy and achieved at least 90% emergence, except at the 0.5% concentration. Compared to the other concentrations, 1% Ethrel provided the most rapid rate of emergence. Growth of the hypocotyl-radicle of afterripened, NC-13 seed samples treated with the 1% concentration was initially slower than that of the controls, but recovery had occurred by the 5th day from planting. However, emeregnce of nondormant ‘Starr’, Spanish-type seedlings was retarded by 1%, but not by 0.5% Ethrel. The Ethrel-fungicide mixture remained stable in storage for 6 months. Field plantings at two locations of dormant, 1% Ethrel-treated seeds resulted in greater than 95% emergence, but the rate of emergence was slower at one location. The data suggest that the Ethrel dust could be combined with the usual fungicide treatment of peanut seeds to stimulate germination of dormant seeds in the field.

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Keywords: Ethrel, Ethylene, Groundnut, Germination, Seedling Emergence, Fungicide

How to Cite:

Ketring, D., (1977) “Physiology of Oil Seeds. VI. A Means to Break Dormancy of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seeds in the Field1,2”, Peanut Science 4(1), p.42-45. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-4-1-10

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Published on
01 Jan 1977
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

1Cooperative investigations of the Southern Region, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

2Mention of a trademark or proprietary product does not constitute endorsement by the United States Department of Agriculture or Texas A&M University and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that also may be suitable.