ARTICLES

Florida Beggarweed (Desmodium tortuosum) and Sicklepod (Senna obtusifolia) Control in Peanut Using Herbicides Applied Through a Wick-Bar¹

Authors: W. C. Johnson , D. L. Colvin , T. A. Littlefield , B. G. Mullinix

  • Florida Beggarweed (Desmodium tortuosum) and Sicklepod (Senna obtusifolia) Control in Peanut Using Herbicides Applied Through a Wick-Bar¹

    ARTICLES

    Florida Beggarweed (Desmodium tortuosum) and Sicklepod (Senna obtusifolia) Control in Peanut Using Herbicides Applied Through a Wick-Bar¹

    Authors: , , ,

Abstract

Tall weeds in peanut fields cause losses other that yield reduction from competition by intercepting fungicides and insecticides, and interfering with harvest efficiency. Studies were conducted at Archer, FL and Tifton, GA in 1994 and 1995 to determine an effective means to selectively control tall Florida beggarweed and sicklepod late season in peanut using herbicides applied with a wickbar. Herbicides evaluated were glyphosate, paraquat, and dimethylalkylamine salt of endothall (DMAA endothall); each applied at 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% by volume. Treatments were applied in two passes at opposite directions midseason at both locations. Glyphosate and paraquat, at concentrations as low as 25% by volume, effectively controlled Florida beggarweed and sicklepod at both locations. DMAA endothall did not adequately control Florida beggarweed or sicklepod at either location, regardless of rate. Peanut yields were not increased by weed control from any herbicide applied with a wick-bar. The only benefits from late-season Florida beggarweed and sicklepod control with a wick-bar appear to be improved fungicide deposition and more efficient mechanical harvest.

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Keywords: Arachis hypogaea L, rope-wick, Weed control

How to Cite:

Johnson, W. & Colvin, D. & Littlefield, T. & Mullinix, B., (1999) “Florida Beggarweed (Desmodium tortuosum) and Sicklepod (Senna obtusifolia) Control in Peanut Using Herbicides Applied Through a Wick-Bar¹”, Peanut Science 26(1), p.18-23. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-26-1-5

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Published on
01 Jan 1999
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

1Cooperative investigations of the USDA-ARS, Univ. of Florida, and Univ. of Georgia. All programs and services of the USDA-ARS, Univ. of Florida, and the Univ. of Georgia are offered on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, or handicap. Mention of a trademark, proprietary product, or vendor does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by the USDA, the Univ. of Georgia, or the Univ. of Florida and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products or vendors that also may be suitable.