ARTICLES

Early-Generation Yield Trials of Peanuts¹

Authors: Terry A. Coffelt , Ray O. Hammons

  • Early-Generation Yield Trials of Peanuts¹

    ARTICLES

    Early-Generation Yield Trials of Peanuts¹

    Authors: ,

Abstract

In 1969, a large number of F2 lines developed from reciprocal infraspecific crosses between the varieties ‘Argentine’ and ‘Early Runner’ was available for use in the peanut (Arachis hypogaea) breeding program at Tifton, Georgia. These lines were used to make preliminary observations on the possible use of early-generation yield trials in developing superior peanut varieties.
High yielding F2 lines were tested consecutively in F3, F4, F5 and F6 yield trials. Lines not out-yielding the parental cultivars were discarded after each test. Lines were placed in F5 and F6 Spanish and Runner yield trials on the basis of seed weight/100 seed. Eight commercial checks were used in the F5 yield trials and five in the F6 yield trials. Yield and shelling grade data from the F5 and F6 yield trials were evaluated statistically. Nine of the twelve breeding lines in the F5 yield trials outyielded the parents. Seven yielded more than the highest yielding commercial check. Two of the five breeding lines in the F6 yield trials did not yield significantly less than the highest yielding commercial check. The remaining three did not yield significantly less than the parental cultivars. Based on these results, early testing in yield trials may be an acceptable breeding procedure for evaluation and selection of peanut varieties.

Keywords: Arachis hypogaea, Infraspecific hybridization

How to Cite:

Coffelt, T. & Hammons, R., (1974) “Early-Generation Yield Trials of Peanuts¹”, Peanut Science . doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/

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Published on
01 Jan 1974

Author Notes

1Cooperative Research by the Southern Region, Agricultural Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, and the University of Georgia, College of Agriculture Experiment Stations. Received October 17, 1973. Work of the senior author was supported by CSRS Project No. GEO 00204, by the Georgia Agricultural Commodity Commission for Peanuts and by an NDEA fellowship to the University of Georgia.