ARTICLES

Simulated Air Flow Rate Effects on Drying Times and Costs for Conventional and Recirculating Peanut Drying Facilities¹

Authors: L. Chai , J. H. Young

  • Simulated Air Flow Rate Effects on Drying Times and Costs for Conventional and Recirculating Peanut Drying Facilities¹

    ARTICLES

    Simulated Air Flow Rate Effects on Drying Times and Costs for Conventional and Recirculating Peanut Drying Facilities¹

    Authors: ,

Abstract

In conventional nonrecirculating peanut drying systems, an air flow rate of 10 m3/min-m3 is recommended. Drying systems utilizing air recirculation need not consider the inefficiency associated with unsaturated air exiting the system, since the extra drying capacity of the air will eventually be utilized. As a result, the air flow rate recommendation for recirculation type drying systems needs to be reexamined. In this study, two computer models were modified to simulate the peanut drying process in a solar-assisted partial air recirculation drying system and a conventional drying system, respectively. The weather data from the 1992 drying season at Lewiston, NC and the parameters of both facilities were used as the input data for the models. Air flow rates of 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20, and 22.5 m3/min-m3 were examined. The simulation results showed that the effect of air flow rate on drying times and costs in a solar-assisted partial air recirculation peanut drying facility was significant. When the air flow rate was increased, the seasonal drying capacity, the electrical and fuel consumption, and total or specific drying cost increased as well. On the other hand, drying time for each wagon decreased and total energy consumption remained relatively constant.

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Keywords: peanut, drying facility, air flow rate, drying cost, drying time, conventional, recirculation

How to Cite:

Chai, L. & Young, J., (1995) “Simulated Air Flow Rate Effects on Drying Times and Costs for Conventional and Recirculating Peanut Drying Facilities¹”, Peanut Science 22(1), p.8-14. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/pnut.22.1.0002

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Published on
31 Dec 1994
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

1Paper No. BAE 9401 of the Journal Series of Biol. and Agric. Eng., North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 276957625. The use of trade names in this publication does not imply endorsement by the North Carolina Agric. Res. Serv. of the product named nor criticism of similar ones not mentioned.