ARTICLES

Geocarposphere Temperature as It Relates to Florunner Peanut Production

Authors: J. I. Davidson , P. D. Blankenship , R. J. Henning , W. R. Guerke , R. D. Smith , R. J. Cole

  • Geocarposphere Temperature as It Relates to Florunner Peanut Production

    ARTICLES

    Geocarposphere Temperature as It Relates to Florunner Peanut Production

    Authors: , , , , ,

Abstract

Geocarposphere (GCS) temperature was correlated to yield, grade, jumbos (outturns), aflatoxin, and germination of Florunner peanuts grown in Southwest Georgia during CY 19811987. Maximum daily GCS temperatures usually provided better correlations with yield and quality factors than minimum and mean daily GCS temperatures. Maximum daily GCS temperatures were also more indicative of plant stress. Minimum GCS temperatures were important for rapid emergence, root growth, and maturation. Both maximum and minimum daily GCS temperatures were important for reducing impact by wet and dry weather pests. Maximum yield and quality will be produced when production practices are managed to maintain GCS temperature in the range of 20-35 C (68-95 F) at planting time, 20-31 C (68-87 F) prior to and during the early part of fruiting, 21-28 C (70-83 F) during primary pod addition and 21-29 C (70-85 F) during primary pod maturation period. However, maximum GCS temperatures below 27 C (80 F) should be avoided to minimize impact of wet weather pests. This and other information that relate scouting data and field history to yield and quality have proven useful in developing an Expert System and models for managing peanut production and marketing.

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Keywords: Geocarposphere temperature, Florunner peanuts, Peanut yield, peanut market quality, grade, outturn, jumbo runner, seed germination, aflatoxin, Expert Systems, production models, marketing models, marketing strategies

How to Cite:

Davidson, J. & Blankenship, P. & Henning, R. & Guerke, W. & Smith, R. & Cole, R., (1991) “Geocarposphere Temperature as It Relates to Florunner Peanut Production”, Peanut Science 18(2), p.79-85. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-18-2-5

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Published on
01 Jul 1991
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

Mention of a trademark or proprietary product does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that may also be available.