ARTICLES

Potential Peanut Performance in Double-Cropping Systems¹

Authors: A. C. Mixon , Clyde C. Dowler

  • Potential Peanut Performance in Double-Cropping Systems¹

    ARTICLES

    Potential Peanut Performance in Double-Cropping Systems¹

    Authors: ,

Abstract

The potential for utilizing selected peanut cultivars in multiple-cropping sequences was studied on a Bonifay sand and Tifton loamy sand soil in cropping sequences with grain sorghum, tomato transplants, and cucumbers. The peanut cultivars Pronto, Comet, and Florunner always produced more pods under a 114-day growing period than for a 99-day growing period. In a 99-day growing period, Pronto and Comet produced significantly more peanuts than Florunner. Total sound mature kernels (TSMK) percentages were always greater for a 114day growing period. Seeding rate did not affect TSMK or OK characteristics. On restricted growth periods (99 days), early-maturing peanut cultivars resulted in higher percentages of TSMK than the late-maturing cultivars. Under small production scale research units, Pronto peanut was planted early April, or late June under both clean and conservation type tillage. The moldboard land preparation portion of a tillage experiment resulted in greater yields when peanut was planted early or late in 4-row seeding, but not statistically more than 2-row seeding. Grain sorghum grown at a population of approximately 200,000 plantsha produced greater yields when planted in July than in August planting. Greater grain yields of sorghum were produced using moldboard land preparation.

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Keywords: Multi-cropping, peanut row spacing, peanut tillage, short season peanut production

How to Cite:

Mixon, A. & Dowler, C., (1984) “Potential Peanut Performance in Double-Cropping Systems¹”, Peanut Science 11(1), p.27-31. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-11-1-9

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Published on
01 Jan 1984

Author Notes

1Cooperative investigations of the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, GA 31793.