ARTICLES

Temperature Effects on Germination and Comparative Morphology of Conidia for Thai and USA Isolates of Cercosporidium personatum¹,²

Authors: Tharmmasak Sommartya , M. K. Beute

  • Temperature Effects on Germination and Comparative Morphology of Conidia for Thai and USA Isolates of Cercosporidium personatum¹,²

    ARTICLES

    Temperature Effects on Germination and Comparative Morphology of Conidia for Thai and USA Isolates of Cercosporidium personatum¹,²

    Authors: ,

Abstract

Ten isolates of Cercosporidium personation (Cp) were collected from seven geographical areas in Thailand and the USA. Four USA and 6 Thai isolates were cultured on a susceptible peanut genotype, NC 3033, to produce conidia for all studies. Conidial germination was determined after 12, 24, and 48 h at 1636 C. Percent germination of conidia for all populations were greatest at 1620 C. At 30 and 32 C, 58 and 22 of conidia from Thai isolates germinated, respectively. Only 33 and 6 of conidia from USA isolates germinated at 30 and 32 C. Only Thai isolates germinated at 36 C. No differences were observed among isolates for conidial length or number of septa per conidium. Conidia of all isolates, however, were longer and had more septa than previously reported. Conidial length in this study ranged from 1690 um and number of septa per conidium ranged from 111. Conidia with furcate branching were observed with both Thai and USA isolates. Forked conidia produced normal germtubes either intercalary or terminally and all three terminal cells produced germ tubes.

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Keywords: Arachis hypogaea, late leafspot, spore germination

How to Cite:

Sommartya, T. & Beute, M., (1986) “Temperature Effects on Germination and Comparative Morphology of Conidia for Thai and USA Isolates of Cercosporidium personatum¹,²”, Peanut Science 13(2), p.67-70. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-13-2-6

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Published on
01 Jul 1986
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

1Paper No. 10349 of the Journal Series of the North Carolina Agriculture Research Service Raleigh, NC 276957601. Use of trade names in this publication does not imply endorsement by the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service of the products named nor critism of similar ones not mentioned.

2This work was supported in part by the Peanut CRSP, USAID grant no. DAN-4048-G-SS-206500. Recommendations do not represent an official position or policy of USAID. Authors wish to express gratitude to P. Backman, F. Shokes and D. Smith for aid in supplying pathogen isolates.