ARTICLES

Interaction of dinitramine and dinoseb with Cylindrocladium crotalariae and the Cylindrocladium black rot (CBR) Disease of Peanut¹

Authors: J. A. Barron , P. M. Phipps

  • Interaction of dinitramine and dinoseb with Cylindrocladium crotalariae and the Cylindrocladium black rot (CBR) Disease of Peanut¹

    ARTICLES

    Interaction of dinitramine and dinoseb with Cylindrocladium crotalariae and the Cylindrocladium black rot (CBR) Disease of Peanut¹

    Authors: ,

Abstract

Axenic growth by Cylindrocladium crotalariae (Loos) Bell & Sobers in potato dextrose broth was suppressed significantly by dinoseb at 50 and 100 μg/mL, and Dyanapá (dinoseb + naptalam) at 100 μg/mL. High concentrations of either dinitramine or alachlor suppressed growth of only one of two C. crotalariae isolates tested. Benefin, diphenamid, vernolate, and 2,4 DB at rates up to 100 μg/mL failed to have similar effects on growth of either isolate. Dinitramine at rates up to 100 μg/g soil had no effect on survival of C. crotalariae microsclerotia (ms) in a Ruston or a Woodstown loamy fine sand. Dinoseb reduced ms populations significantly in Woodstown soil at 5, 10, 50 and 100 μg/g soil and in Ruston soil at rates of 50 and 100 μg/g soil. Soil type inoculum density, and herbicide dosage were demonstrated to be important interacting factors affecting CBR development in peanut. Greenhouse and field tests implicated dinitramine at 0.56 kg/ha and dinoseb at 1.68 kg/ha as herbicide treatments which can increase the severity of CBR in Florigiant peanut.

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Keywords: Arachis hypogaea L, Calonectria crotalariae (Loos) Bell & Sobers, herbicides, microsclerotia, soil type

How to Cite:

Barron, J. & Phipps, P., (1983) “Interaction of dinitramine and dinoseb with Cylindrocladium crotalariae and the Cylindrocladium black rot (CBR) Disease of Peanut¹”, Peanut Science 10(2), p.101-106. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-10-2-16

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Published on
01 Jan 1983
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

1Contribution of the Tidewater Research and Continuing Education Center and the Department of Plant Pathology and Physiology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061. This research was supported in part by USDA cooperative agreement 12-14-7001-855 and represents a portion of the senior author's Ph.D. dissertation. Mention of a trademark or proprietary product does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that may be suitable.