ARTICLES

Physiology of Oil Seeds. VIII. Germination of Peanut Seeds Exposed to Subfreezing Temperatures while Drying in the Windrow1,2

Author: D. L. Ketring

  • Physiology of Oil Seeds. VIII. Germination of Peanut Seeds Exposed to Subfreezing Temperatures while Drying in the Windrow1,2

    ARTICLES

    Physiology of Oil Seeds. VIII. Germination of Peanut Seeds Exposed to Subfreezing Temperatures while Drying in the Windrow1,2

    Author:

Abstract

During November 1976, freshly dug, high-moisture (30-40%) peanuts drying in the windrow in North Texas were exposed to subfreezing overnight temperatures for 6 days. The effects of that exposure on germination of the seeds were studied. Samples of the subsequently cured and hand-shelled peanut seeds were tested for germination, seedling emergence, ethylene and carbon dioxide production, and certain enzyme activities. Laboratory germination was 42%, greenhouse seedling emergence 32%, and most of the freeze-damaged seeds that germinated grew at a slow rate. Germination and greenhouse seedling emergence of controls were 96 and 100%, respectively. At their maximum rates, ethylene and carbon dioxide production by freeze-damaged seeds were reduced 83 and 36%, respectively. Mean enzyme activities measured from protein extracts of the freeze-damaged seeds were reduced, but they were not always significantly different from the control. However, isocitric lyase activity, which depends on de novo protein synthesis, was significantly less for freeze-damaged than for control seeds, particularly during initial stages of germination. Thus, low-temperature exposure of high-moisture peanut seeds interfered with the initial biochemical and developmental processes, such as synthesis of new proteins, that determine seedling growth.

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Keywords: Seedling growth, Ethylene, carbon dioxide, enzyme activities

How to Cite:

Ketring, D., (1979) “Physiology of Oil Seeds. VIII. Germination of Peanut Seeds Exposed to Subfreezing Temperatures while Drying in the Windrow1,2”, Peanut Science 6(2), p.80-83. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-6-2-4

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Published on
01 Jul 1979
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

1Cooperative Investigations of USDA-SEA, Agricultural Research, Southern Region, and the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas A&M University.

2Mention of a trademark name or proprietary product does not constitute endorsement by the United States Department of Agriculture or Texas A&M University and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that also may be suitable.