ARTICLES

Field Tests with Pirimiphos-Methyl as a Protectant for Farmers Stock Peanuts¹

Authors: L. M. Redlinger , R. A. Simonaitis

  • Field Tests with Pirimiphos-Methyl as a Protectant for Farmers Stock Peanuts¹

    ARTICLES

    Field Tests with Pirimiphos-Methyl as a Protectant for Farmers Stock Peanuts¹

    Authors: ,

Abstract

Farmers stock peanuts were treated with pirimiphosmethyl (0- [2- (diethvlamino)-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl] 0,0-dimethyl phosphorothioate) applied at rates of 10, 20, and 30 ppm as a protectant against stored-product insects and stored in metal bins (4.5 metric tons) for 1 year. Similar peanuts were treated with malathion (diethyl mercaptosuccinate S-ester with 0,0-dimethyl phosphorodithioate) applied at a rate of 52.1 ppm as a standard for comparison. Although residues of pirimiphos-methyl decreased ca. 63% during the year (half of the decrease during the first 4 months), rates of 20 and 30 ppm gave excellent protection for 1 year, and a rate of 10 ppm gave protection for about 6 months. Malathion was relatively ineffective, either because it degraded so rapidly the first 2 months or because malathion-resistant strains of insects were present.

Of the 16 species of stored-product insects found in the peanuts, red flour beetles, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), and almond moths, Cadra cautella (Walker), were the predominant species.

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Keywords: pirimiphos-methyl, protectant, peanuts, insecticide residues, insect damage, stored-product insects, malathion-resistant insects

How to Cite:

Redlinger, L. & Simonaitis, R., (1977) “Field Tests with Pirimiphos-Methyl as a Protectant for Farmers Stock Peanuts¹”, Peanut Science 4(1), p.32-36. doi: https://doi.org/10.3146/i0095-3679-4-1-7

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Published on
01 Jan 1977
Peer Reviewed

Author Notes

1This paper reports the results of research only. Mention of a pesticide in this paper does not constitute a recommendation for use by the U.S. Department of Agriculture nor does it imply registration under FIFRA as amended. Also, mention of a commercial or a proprietary product in this paper does not constitute an endorsement for use by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

3The Peanut Insect Investigations is now a part of the Stored-Product Insects Research and Development Laboratory, Savannah, Ga.